“A number of remarkable and persistent findings of health benefits in response to Qigong” were found in a study of 79 randomized clinical trials published by the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Health Institute website. 

The studies’ respected authors reported “the preponderance of studies showed significant, positive results on the tested health outcomes.” 

“This review has identified numerous outcomes with varying levels of evidence for the efficacy for Qigong … including bone health, cardiopulmonary fitness and related biomarkers, physical function, falls prevention and balance, general quality of life and patient reported outcomes, immunity, and psychological factors such as anxiety, depression and self-efficacy.”

The authors did a comprehensive review of 79 randomized clinical trials done between 1993 and 2007 involving a total of 6,410 participants comparing Qigong to exercise groups or other control groups. Qigong is a broad term that encompasses many styles including relatively more modern styles such as Tai Chi and Taiji.

According to a comprehensive review of Health Benefits of Qigong and Tai Chi published on the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Health Institute web site by Roger Jahnke, OMD, Linda Larkey, PhD, Carol Rogers, Jennifer Etnier, PhD, and Fang Lin.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3085832/